Prof. Ian Blake University of British Columbia, November 21, 2008

November 21, 2008
Prof. Ian Blake University of British Columbia

Abstract:

The discrete logarithm problem has played a central role in the development of cryptography. Froma simple example of a one-way function in the multiplicativegroup of a finite field, in the paper that defined publickey cryptography over three decades ago, through itsdevelopment in a variety of algebraic structures,it is now part of numerous international security standards. The problem has evolved in many waysand generated a large number of research directionsthat are ongoing today. This talk will give anoverview of many of these developments. It is intended for a general audience.

Bio:

Ian F. Blake received his undergraduate education at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario and his Ph.D. at Princeton University in New Jersey. From 1967 to 1969 he was a Research Associate with the Jet Propulsion Laboratories in Pasadena, California. From 1969 to 1996 he was with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Waterloo, in Waterloo, Ontario where he was Chairman from 1978 to 1984 and Director of the Institute of Computer Research from 1990 to 1994. He was with HP Labs in Palo Alto, CAfrom 1996 t0 1999 and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Torontofrom 2000 to 2007. His research interests are in the areas of cryptography, algebraic coding theory, digital communications and spread spectrum systems. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, the CAE and RSC. He was awarded an IEEE Millennium Medal.